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This is not my typical mortgage article but was important for me to write so I hope you like it!

As a self-employed entrepreneur and solo mortgage broker, it can get lonely and difficult in this business and having only been doing this for 3.5 years, I have had my days when I wanted to quit!  I am sure I am not alone.

Last year was the best year I ever had and I was riding that wave until the new mortgage rules arrived in November of 2016.  Where we as brokers were restricted by the new rules the government had initiated, I was hearing time and time again how the banks were not playing by the same rules.

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This is not my usual mortgage article but I hope you will read on anyways. I am writing about how being a mortgage broker makes me grateful everyday!

I am an avid blogger – I love writing and sharing my knowledge and experience but that last two weeks have been a mental struggle for me. I finally stopped beating myself up and sat down to think why I was struggling and realized it was because I had forsaken my daily gratitude habit, because I have been so busy with work and life in general.

I have learned through various strategies, readings, courses that having the practice of being grateful not only brings peace into my life but the ability to focus and expand that gratitude into all areas of my life, including work and family.

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Currently we are dealing with a “seller’s” market not a “buyer’s market so how do you differentiate between the two? How do you navigate the sellers market and still come out a winner? And how do you buy when the market is overheated?

So how do you figure out if it’s a seller’s market or a buyer’s market? The easiest way is to look at unsold inventory. If the inventory on the market is between four and six months you have an even playing field between a sellers and buyers market. Less than that and it is usually a sellers market and beyond that and it is usually a buyers market.

If you are shopping for a home currently you are probably coming up against too many bidding wars – that’s because the inventory is low and houses are selling for thousands over asking and usually in 1-2 days. So how do you navigate this current market and still come out a winner? Continue reading

Creating the Life

The other day I was driving to do some errands with my 8 year old daughter and she commented on some really nice cars ­ I first thought “wow she has good taste” and then she said “mom, when I am old enough to drive you are going to buy me that right?” and I thought, where do kids get their needs and wants from? And are we shaping their needs and wants?  I explained that when she was old enough she was going to get a J.O.B. and earn what she wanted to have and not be given what she wanted.  She did not like that one bit, which inspired me to write this post.

What if anything are we teaching our children about wealth creation, about needs vs. wants and how to attain those needs rather than wants? Continue reading

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At present thousands of homeowners across Canada are eyeing their options with more than a little trepidation. The majority of Canadians after all, are risk averse and when it comes to our mortgage options many of us have traditionally chosen fixed rather than variable interest rates, in order to allow us to avoid sudden hikes in the Canadian Prime. In fact, even just the idea of being stuck on a variable rate after a hike in the prime leaves many of us on edge. Yes, we can lock the rate in if we think the prime is getting too high, but who is to say we’ll manage to do that right at the right moment? Rate hikes after all, can leave homeowners not just paying less off their principle, but them facing paying more interest over the long run.

All that said, recent studies have demonstrated that historically at least, homeowners on variable rates have actually saved more in the long term when compared to more risk averse homeowners opting for locked in rates. These being the case, between 2008 and the present, variable rate mortgage options have experienced something of resurgence in popularity. Moreover, those who have been part of this resurgence have made significant savings. The Canadian prime has consistently fallen since 2008 in tandem with Central Bank instigated economic recovery measures. This being the case, those who elected for fixed rate mortgages back in the 2000-2008 (supposed) boom years, have been left feeling a little cheated to say the least. Continue reading